You’re a bus driver and your heading south with 55 passengers.

Leg one of the trip, 4.4 miles and turn east.

Leg 2 – 3.3 miles

Leg 3 Turn back south 2.2 miles

Leg 4 Turn East 1.1 miles

You’ve driven 2 directions but made three turns for 4 different legs.  4.4+3.3+2.2+1.1 = 11 miles.

Question:  How old is the bus driver?

 

You are the bus driver – how old are you?

When someone is trying to take your focus off – get it back.

Zig Ziglar

   

How often do we pride ourselves on being great listeners, yet we just blow stuff off?

 

As leaders, we all have a full plate, stuff overflowing – but we have to remember that our people are what matters most.  Without them, we will not create anywhere near what we are capable of.

 

Today I want to share 3 keys that will make you a better leader.

 

1/        How many times has someone told you that something bothers them, really bothers them, but you just blew them off?  Then, they end up leaving your organization, and you sit there wondering why.  But they tell everyone else, “this was bugging me, I tried to get the boss to see it, but he/she just didn’t listen.”

 

Great leadership requires great listening and taking action. 

Make sure you become aware of those things that are getting under the skin of your team and do something about them.

 

2/        How many times has everyone but you known that a person in your organization is not what you think they are?  Yet your mind is made up, and you ignore their objections and keep rolling.  Companies have lost money, good people and great opportunities because the leader did not listen to those he/she should trust the most. 

Keep these communication lines open, and make sure your team is not afraid to tell you the truth.

 

A long time ago, I learned the hard way that a prospect should never come ahead of a customer.  The same applies here: the new guy/girl (the one who you believe can  walk on water) should not come ahead of those you trust and who have helped you get there so much in the past.

 

 

3/        When you mess up, stop, admit it, and clear the air.  As leaders, we often do little stupid stuff, which we just blow off, but this can create a wall that stops us from ever earning the maximum performance of our players. 

I remember giving a chair to one of my sales people in our old office.  Later, when we moved to our new office, I took it back and used it myself, never saying anything.  Not that big a deal, right?  I wasn’t able to put that relationship right again until I sucked it up and admitted how stupid I was. 

Be careful, the little stuff does really matter.   Maybe not to you, but to someone.

 

Leaders, open your mind and listen this week.  Take a look around and see if any of these apply to you and your team.  If so, do what you need to make it right.  You might be amazed by the results.

 

Want more on being the best?

Watch this video and start that journey to being the best.