How have you done with the hiring of sales people?   
Let’s look at some simple stories.

When I finally hired a sales rep, after much discussion
and hesitation, they produced nothing.  They talked a
great game, but when it came to the end results, they were a zero.

I hate my sales rep; they keep talking about the business
they are going to bring in, but they bring in nothing.  I
know I should fire the rep, but what if they are just about
to close the “big deal” any time now?

The last time I hired a rep, they did absolutely nothing.  
I hired them to sell and they were looking to me for direction.  
Isn’t that what I hired them for in the first place?

Wow, three stories that I know many of you can relate to on
both sides.  Why is it that so many mistakes are made in the
hiring of effective sales reps?

Well, first of all, setting expectations for your new sales
person prior to them ever accepting the job is probably the
most critical item you need to address. If you have finally
come to the decision to hire a sales person, a sales manager
or a sales director, then take the time, effort and energy to
define your expectations and put them all down in writing.  If you are
the one being hired, then make sure your prospective employer
does this for you.

As a sales consultant, I keep running into the same story:
“I hired a new sales person, full time and they have now been
with me for 6 weeks and I do not see those great results I was
expecting.”

Well, what did you expect?
    Did you communicate those expectations to your new
    sales person?
    Did you tell them what you expected them to achieve
    and in what time frame?  
    Did you define what you expected, and when, in detail?
    Did you write it down and did you both sign it?

Do you know the answers to the following questions and did you
communicate this to your rep?
    What is your sales cycle?
    Do you know how long it takes to sell your product
    or service?
    Do you know the process involved in successfully
    selling your product?

Let’s look at some expectations of a new sales person.  
First, it is critical to put together a list of all the tasks
you expect this person to do.  This needs to be detailed, such as:
·     Attend all local chamber events, and other networking
      events
·    Make 20 cold calls a day
·    Turn in a written sales report weekly in this format,
     with this data.
·    Be in the office, for X days and hours
·    You can work at home when and under what conditions
·    Put all sales data into your sales management system
     within 24 hours
·    Attend the following tradeshows each year
·    Go on 10 appointments a week
·    Visit existing customers every quarter
·    Call existing customers every month
·    Define suspects, prospects and hot prospects

And this is just a start.

The next step is to define and communicate the sales process
for your industry.  Even if you are hiring an industry-experienced
person, all companies have their own way of operating, so define what
yours is.
Look at these items:
·    Where and how do I meet contacts, at tradeshows, networking
     events or cold calling?
·    Once met, what is the next step – send some information to
     the person?
·    When do I do follow up calls?
·    How soon after meeting a person should I be expected to
     get an appointment?
·    What do I do at the appointment? Show your process.
.    What tools do I use?
.    What is the expected results on the first call, do I go for a close?
     Or do I go for a second appointment to learn more?
·    Close the deal – when and how?

What are the close rates for your industry and what do you expect this
person to do?  For every appointment you go on, you should get a
second appointment what percentage of the time?

For every second appointment you go on, you should close how many?
How many appointments does it take to get one new customer?

Layout what you expect.  During the first year, or even better, a 2 year expectation process, laid out by quarter, monitored and updated very 30 days

Targets need to be defined.
    What are they suppose to go after?
        Example, all companies with 50 employees, a certain
        industry, or companies in a certain industry?
    Should they target a certain geographic area?
        The more you define and write down, the more effective
        the new sales person’s effort can be and the more you
        can expect to be done.

Status reporting is very critical.
    Sales people hate to do reports.  
        So please take the time and define what you want, when and how.
        Then get full commitment to it.
        However, make sure what you ask for is what you really need and
        what will really help in evaluation of effort.
        Then hold them to it.
        Do not let it slide.

This is just a small list of the things we look at when we help you to
develop a sales process.

Once developed, the new sales person has to read it, agree/modify it and
commit to it.  All this has to be done prior to you hiring the person.

Doing this will stop the biggest problems I see with small/medium
companies and their sales people.
    Owner: “I expected you to do this and produce this”.
    Sales Person: “I thought you expect something else”.
    Owner: “I don’t need someone doing that”.
    Sales Person: “I am not doing that”.

This is why so many sales people last less than 6 months in a new job.
Take the time in your organization to define exactly what you want
and what you expect.  Hiring the right sales person is so critical
to your success.  Take time and effort to do it right.

Looking for an edge? Could coaching be that edge?
Could coaching make you an even stronger leader?

Want to find out?

Two great options moving forward.

First, you should come to our great Sales and Marketing Boot Camp.

Two energized days of interaction, learning, building relationships.

All for only $97

Learnmore:

http://thedecisioninstitute.com/big-money-for-small-business-owners-bootcamp/

 

 

Second, if that doesn’t work for you – call me and let’s set that meeting up to learn more 856 358 4021 – or email  Manny@MannyNowak.com